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The P-40 was the last and best known of Curtiss Hawk series fighters. The P-40 had no serious vices and was a pleasant aircraft to fly. When flown by an experienced pilot was able to give a good account of itself in aerial combat. It's indisputable advantage was also very tough construction, which made the aircraft capable of bringing it's pilot home despite sometimes heavy damage. Unsurprisingly for the massive production of almost 14,000 aircraft, the P-40 went through many changes during it's life. Little resemblance can be found between last production variants and the original concept. 

Curtiss P-40K, serial number 42-9733, c. 2015 

P-40Ks were the slowest and heaviest P-40 variants and they were widely used by US units in the CBI. The P-40K was the primary type used by the 10th Air Force to establish air superiority in the China/Burma theater (CBI), achieving dominance over Japanese Army types in that theater. 

P-40K was originally planned as final production variant. The P-40K series marked the introduction of the more powerful Allison V-1710-73 (F4R) engine rated at 1325 hp for takeoff and 1150 hp at 11,800 feet. This engine had an automatic boost control. P-40K was an Allison-engined P-40L, with the nose-top scoop retained and the Allison-configured nose radiators scoop, cowl flaps and vertical-stabilizer-to-fuselage fillet. P-40K was supplied to the Commonwealth air forces as the Kittyhawk Mk III.

Early production P-40Ks featured a short fuselage of the P-40E with enlarged  fin, 
which can be seen on the second aircraft [Via]

The maximum speed of the P-40K was 320 mph at 5000 feet and 362 mph at 15,000 feet. A climb to 15,000 feet took 7.5 minutes. Range was 350 miles with a 500-pound bomb attached. Ferry range was 1600 miles. Weights were 6400 pounds empty, 8400 pounds gross, and 10,000 pounds maximum. Most of the P-40Ks served with the US forces in Asia and the Pacific and under Lend-Lease with the Chinese Air Force.

A USAAF Curtiss P-40K-10-CU, serial number 42-9985, c. 1943

This rare Curtiss Wright P-40K, N4436J and s/n 42-9733, was ground up restoration by Pioneer Aero Restorations Ltd. He has flight only 205 hours from then. The fuselage was completely rebuilt aft of frame five (behind the pilot); everything forward of the firewall was replaced; and the tail feathers were rebuilt. The cockpit interior was completely restored, the left wing was stripped and rebuilt from the leading edge up, and the right wing was rebuilt. The team replaced or rebuilt the wingtips, flaps and ailerons.

This rare Curtiss Wright P-40K, N4436J and s/n 42-9733, was ground up restoration by Pioneer Aero Restorations Ltd. He has flight only 205 hours from then. The fuselage was completely rebuilt aft of frame five (behind the pilot); everything forward of the firewall was replaced; and the tail feathers were rebuilt. The cockpit interior was completely restored, the left wing was stripped and rebuilt from the leading edge up, and the right wing was rebuilt. The team replaced or rebuilt the wingtips, flaps and ailerons.

Curtiss P-40K, serial number 42-9733, c. 2015

This P-40K was delivered to the Army Air Force on August 31, 1942, and first went to Great Falls AFB. On January 26, 1943, it was transferred to Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. At Adak AFB on May 12, 1945, it was condemned as "surplus," but 40 years later, collector Bob Sturges rescued its remains just before the area in which it was discovered was to be used as a nuclear test site.

Some featured avionic components of this Warbird are: Garmin 250 XL Comm/GPS, Becker Panel Mount Comm, Garmin GTX320 Transponder and Encoder.

Engine is an Allison V-1710, 205 Hours SMOH by Vintage V-12 (1999) and propeller is a Curtis Electric C5320D, 205 Hours SMOH by Safe Air Limited.

Curtiss P-40K, serial number 42-9733, c. 2015

This example is for sale via www.courtesyaircraft.com

Source: 

Wikipedia | www.courtesyaircraft.com | Joseph Baugher - www.p40warhawk.com | www.ipmsstockholm.org
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