The Panther's excellent combination of firepower, mobility, and armoured protection made it a formidable foe. During the Battle of Normandy, the German Panzer Divisions had among their regiments and battalions many Panther tanks. 

In June 1944, the Panzer Divisions in Normandy that had Pzkpfw V Panthers among their tanks were: the 12th SS Panzer Division Hitlerjugend, with 66 Panthers, the Panzer Division Lehr, with 89 Panthers and the 2nd Panzer Division, with 79 Panthers, in total, 234 Panthers. In July 1944, the intense combats with Allies forces and his air superiority weakened the German armored forces. After combats, these same Panzer Divisions had 29 Panthers in total: 13 from the 12th SS Panzer Division Hitlerjugend and 16 from the Panzer Division Lehr.  

In July 1944, other Panzer Divisions arrived at Normandy after landings. They were the 2nd SS Panzer Division Das Reich, with 79 Panthers, the 1st SS Panzer Division Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler, with 89 Panthers, the 9th SS Panzer Division Hohenstaufen, with 79 Panthers, and the 116th Panzer Division, with 79 Panthers, in total, 326 Panthers. 

In August 1944, the nine Panzer Divisions that were in Normandy had only 82 tanks, of that, only 20 were Panthers, all of them from the Panzer Division Lehr.

Here you can display, thanks to government archives, specially from Germany and United Kingdom, and other web pages, 35 sad and amazing images of Many Panthers destroyed, knocked, burnt, captured and abandoned during the Battle of Normandy.

One Panther Tank got as far as Battalion Headquarters in Bretteville

[Via www.ibiblio.org]

Side view of German Panther tank, Normandy, 1944. This tank was knocked out by tanks of 3rd/4th County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters) of 4th Armoured Brigade. It was fitted with a powerful 7.5 cm KwK 42 L/70 gun capable of penetrating the armour of any British tank

[Via National Army Museum - NAM. 1975-03-63-18-122]

Panther tanks among German tanks captured by the Allies, Normandy, Summer 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Archives Normandie 1939-45, p013441]

US soldiers moving near a burning German Panzer V "Panther" tank at Périers, France, August 1944.

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Australian War Memorial, P02018.307]

US airmen check the results of their attacks on a Panzer V Panther neutralized along a hedge, in Normandy

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Archives Normandie 1939-45]

US soldiers celebrate with a captured German flag in front of a destroyed Panther tank. The group of infantrymen were left behind to "mop-up" in Chambois, France, last stronghold of the Germans in the Falaise Gap area

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - National Archives and Records Administration]

British troops advance past a knocked-out German PzKpfw V Panther Ausf A, June 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museums, B 5534]

Destroyed tanks on Mont Ormel (Hill 262). Left is a Sherman, right foreground is an SdKfz 251, behind it is a Panther

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Jan Marowski, Śladami czołgów Pierwszej Dywizji Pancernej, Wrocław 1948]

Battle of Normandy, Summer 1944: US soldiers inspect the wreckage of a German Panther tank

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Archives Normandie 1939-45,  p013039]

French civilians in a pony and trap pass a knocked-out German Panther tank in the Falaise-Argentan area, 22 August 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum]

Two Panzer V destroyed on the side of the road belonging to the 1st Company, 130th Regiment, Panzer Lehr Division

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Archives Normandie 1939-45, p012469]

Infantry of 2nd Battalion, Essex Regiment file past a knocked out German Panther tank on a road near Tilly-sur-Seulles, 19 June 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 5768]

A Panther of Panzer Lehr Division, one of five knocked out in the village of Lingèvres by a single Sherman Firefly of 4th/7th Dragoon Guards on 14 June 1944. The Panther was a formidable opponent, superior to most Allied tanks, but vulnerable to the British 17-pounder gun mounted on the Firefly

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 5780]

A motorcycle despatch rider passes a knocked-out Sherman tank and behind, a German Panther at Fontenay-le-Pesnel, 27 June 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 6043]

A Loyd carrier and 6-pdr anti-tank gun of the Durham Light Infantry, 49th (West Riding) Division parked alongside a knocked-out German Panther tank during Operation 'Epsom', 27 June 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 6045]

A 6-pdr anti-tank gun crew of the Durham Light Infantry, 49th (West Riding) Division inspect a knocked-out German Panther tank during Operation 'Epsom', 27 June 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 6046]

Men of the Durham Light Infantry, 49th (West Riding) Division 'advance' past a knocked-out German Panther tank during Operation 'Epsom', 27 June 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 6049]

Overturned German Panther tank at Norrey-en-Bessin, 27 June 1944. The tank was probably up-ended during the Allied heavy bomber raid at the start of Operation 'Epsom'

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 6053]

A Sherman tank of 24th Lancers, 8th Armoured Brigade, passing a knocked-out German PzKpfw V Panther tank near Rauray, 30 June 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 6226]

A half-track passes a knocked-out German Panther tank on a road near Tourville, 16 July 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 7598]

Carriers of the Queen's Regiment drive through a cornfield as a German Panther tank burns in the background, during the advance towards Aunay-sur-Odon, 31 July - 1 August 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 8375]

Carriers of the Queen's Regiment drive through a cornfield as a German Panther tank burns in the background, during the advance towards Aunay-sur-Odon, 31 July - 1 August 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 8376]

A German Panther tank lies among the ruins of Argentan, 21 August 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 9537]

A knocked-out German Panther tank and a dead infantryman in the Falaise pocket, 25 August 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 9664]

A Churchill tank and behind, a captured German Panther of the 4th Coldstream Guards in action against Geijsteren castle on the banks of the Maas, 29 November 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 12183]

Knocked-out German Panther tanks on the outskirts of Lingevres, 20 June 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 5784]

Royal Engineers search for mines near a knocked out German Panther tank, near Villers Bocage, 4 August 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 8573]

Three French boys looking at a knocked-out German Panther tank in the Falaise pocket, 25 August 1944

 [Via commons.wikimedia.org - Imperial War Museum, B 9665]

Knocked-out Panther tank, destroyed by an infantry PIAT at Bretteville-en-Orguilleuse, 1944

[Via National Army Museum - NAM. 1975-03-63-18-54]

Knocked out German Panther tanks in Normandy, 1944. This tank was one of seven German Panther tanks knocked out by British anti-tank guns south of Bretteville-en-Orguilleuse in Normandy

[Via National Army Museum - NAM. 1975-03-63-18-60]

The side of a Panther tank turret, cracked by three glancing blows of 75 mm HE, June 1944. The three hits from 3rd/4th County Shermans killed the turret crew, but apart from cracking the thick armour plating did no other damage to the tank

[Via National Army Museum - NAM. 1975-03-63-18-162]

Knocked out German Panther, Normandy 1944

[Via thatconflict.com]

Knocked out German Panther, St Gilles France 1944

[Via thatconflict.com]

Americans take a German panzer. The German 21st Panzer Division was in position behind the beaches and moved forward early on June 6th. It made it all the way to the beach, but did not have nearly enough power to roll up the entire invasion. When the Division Commander saw more US paratroopers being dropped behind him, he turned his force around and headed to safety

[Via worldwartwo.filminspector.com]

A group of GIs take a breather amid the ruins of the French town of Argentan. A disabled German Panther tank, belonging to 116.Panzer Division, lies next to them - Normandy 1944

[Via histomil.com]

Source: 

commons.wikimedia.org | www.ibiblio.org | National Army Museum | Archives Normandie | Australian War Memorial | National Archives and Records Administration | Imperial War Museums | thatconflict.com | worldwartwo.filminspector.com | histomil.com
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